« Running as if to meet the moon »
Thierry Basile, Florent Dubois, Clarice Calvo-Pinsolle, Gaïa Vincensini

28.09.2019

 

 

Installation view of ‘Running as if to meet the moon’ at giselle, Toulouse.
Thierry Basile, Florent Dubois, Clarice Calvo-Pinsolle, Gaïa Vincensini

 

‘l’énigme de la rêverie solitaire’, 2019
Printed digital drawing, 59 x 84 cm
Gaïa Vincensini

 

‘l’énigme de la rêverie solitaire’ (detail), 2019
Printed digital drawing, 59 x 84 cm
Gaïa Vincensini

 

‘Hey qt’, 2019
Pen on paper, 29,7 x 21 cm
Florent Dubois

 

‘Une famille’, 2019
Pen on paper, 40 x 30 cm
Florent Dubois

 

Installation view of ‘Running as if to meet the moon’ at giselle, Toulouse.
Thierry Basile, Florent Dubois, Clarice Calvo-Pinsolle, Gaïa Vincensini

 

‘Nest’, 2019
Glazed ceramic, quail eggs, 50 x 28 cm
Thierry Basile

 

‘Nest’ (detail), 2019
Glazed ceramic, quail eggs, 50 x 28 cm
Thierry Basile

 


‘Bonus’, 2019
Ceramics, dimensions variable
Thierry Basile

 

‘Bonus’ (detail), 2019
Ceramics, dimensions variable
Thierry Basile

 


‘inhalateur 1’, 2018
Glazed ceramic Clarice
Calvo Pinsolle

 


‘inhalateur 1’, 2018
Glazed ceramic Clarice
Calvo Pinsolle

 


Installation view of ‘Running as if to meet the moon’ at giselle, Toulouse.
Thierry Basile, Florent Dubois, Clarice Calvo-Pinsolle, Gaïa Vincensini

 

 

 

 

 

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In 1843, William Yarrel published A History of British Birds, a three-volume book that became a reference for many : more scientifically accurate than previous ornithological publications, it covered all of the birds known to exist in Britain, was full of illustrations, precise descriptions and anecdotes. One of these anecdotes described an event that, to this day, still elucidates bird lovers and scientists :

‘… there was greate plenty of strang birds, that shewed themselves at the time the apples were in full rype, who fedde upon the kernells onely of these apples, and haveinge a bill with one beake wrythinge over the other (…) The oldest man living had never heard or reade of any such like bird ; and the thinge most to be noted was, that it seemed they came out of some country not inhabited …’

The above event that is described, and that Yarrel included in his apparent overview of British birds, describes the sudden appearance of a bird species called crossbills, that took place in England in 1593. This type of abrupt and unusual reunion is known as an ‘irruption’.

Irruptions are sporadic migrations that are hasty and that take place for no apparent reason. They appear as if out of nowhere, and then disappear just as suddenly.
Irregular, unforeseen, and unpredictable, irruptions can’t really be qualified as calculated movements or migrations, they’re something entirely different. The motivations and reasons behind them are still unknown, the timing is unpredictable, the occurrence is uneven and dramatic.

Shifting range, appearing and disappearing, a strange move. An unexpected appearance, leaving you wondering why and how it happened.

Yarrel included this anecdote amongst the other, more scientific, precise and clear accounts of different bird species that have been encountered in his country. Maybe the strangeness of this story let him let go of logical reasoning. Maybe the sheer weirdness of this event terrified him, and sharing it would lead him to a comforting answer. Like a bottle thrown at sea.

Strange birds rushing together for a short moment, an appearance so unexpected and impulsive that by the time you realize it’s there it’s already disappeared. A movement that nothing could have logically led up to. An event that, for a short moment, leaves you feeling stunned, between bewilderment and shock.

Strange birds, strange moves.

 

 

Text by Ryder Morey-Weale